Danganronpa: Trigger Happy Havoc Review

Danganronpa is one of these newer visual novel games that have exploded in popularity. I have seen pictures of Monokuma (the series’ main villain) all over and Loot Anime even gave out a the same tie one fo the characters wear in the game. Of course, being a cat with high curiosity, I decided to test fate and get the first game, Trigger Happy Havoc, from Gamefly and give it a shot. There’s plenty to like and plenty to hate.

First, the good stuff. The plot and background are amazing. A bunch of teenagers who are “the ultimate” in a certain field is sent to this prestigious school because of their talents. In reality, this school is actually a prison set up by a bear named Monokuma who tells them that they are here forever and the only way to leave is to kill one student and not get caught.

That right there is intriguing. There is so much that can be done with that idea. There are some points where we do see some good stuff come out of it. The characters, for the most part, are interesting. The best of the lot are Sakura, Aoi, Kyoko and Hiro. There was a lot of thought put into these characters that you care a lot about what happens to them.

Sadly, the other characters aren’t as interesting. The majority are killed off before they get any kind of development whatsoever. The absolute worst  is Byakuya. I don’t care what kind of half-assed development he got; I just wanted to see that stuck up, egotistical little shit get killed in the most horrible way possible.

Visually, the game looks unique. Each character has a unique, memorable look to them, even Monokuma who’s just a black and white teddy bear. Sadly, the school itself looks generic. Nothing about it stands out which is sad because you will be doing a lot of exploring around. You will forget where everything is because these locations don’t stand out at all.

This is also the game’s biggest weakness: the gameplay blows, especially the trail portions. There are three parts to the game. The first is exploration where you have free time to talk with any character to gain new abilities and SP. You can even give them gifts to increase your relationship with them. If you’ve played any dating sim, you know how this goes. The second part is investigating each murder where you’re being led by the nose to each location to find clues (or “truth bullets” as the game calls them.” Finally, there’s the trial. This part is just one gimmicky mini-game after another. All of them suck. Why is there a rhythm game  in a trial? Hell, once you get a certain skill this rhythm game becomes a no-brainer.

The worst part is the twist at the end that explains why they’re trapped in the school. I don’t care what anybody says, I did the Nostalgia Critic’s “this is stupid” bit when I saw that. It’s not just normal stupid, it’s so stupid for words that I just stopped caring about the story after that. I just wanted the game to end. Now.

While the  story and setting are great, the ending ruins it. Not to mention the horrendous gameplay isn’t worth your time. Just watch the anime, you’ll get the same experience without the gameplay.

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Spooksville: The Secret Path Review.

It’s my favorite time of year: Halloween! I don’t care that some Halloween traditions are corny, I like them. One of them is diving into horror anything. This time, I found a book series called Spooksville by Christopher Pike and after reading the first book The Secret Path it’s not that bad.

Adam has just moved to the small town of Springville-or Spooksville as it’s more commonly known as because of all the scary stuff that happens. He meets two of the town’s kids: Sally, who has a massive crush on him and Watch who’s called that because he wears four watches. Watch decides to drapAdam and Sally on an adventure to the find The Secret Path, but that then leads them to some scary events.

First off, I will admit that this book series is the typical young adult horror book series. It’s a basic storyline with some basic situations. The reason this one stands out is characterization. All three main leads are likable and their personalities don’t come off as forced (except Sally. She’s a bit too quirky.)

Yes, a spooky town has been overdone (Eerie Indiana, anyone? What do you mean you’ve never heard of it? Look it up) but the first book does make this town out to be a little different. There’s a lot to be explored here and the next few books do sound like they will expand on it.

Will I continue this series? Yes, because this is like Goosebumps but with the same characters. I’m not expecting much from this series, but it does have promise. It’s not a phenomenon like Goosebumps is even with a TV series, but it’s still worth what some people call “light reading” or something quick to read for Halloween.

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Let’s Talk About The Baby-sitters Club

Yes, you read that right. I’m a guy who was curious about the Baby-sitters Club books. Yes, I’m comfortable with my sexuality. I did it out of purely academic interest. I mean, they’re there to be read, right?

Anyway, I only read the first book Kristy’sGreat Idea. That was more than enough for me to give an honest view.

Basically, the first book is about four friends who create a club for babysitters (thus the title) and they babysit a whole bunch. That’s really it.

Yes, I’m aware there have been a lot more books written n the series (my sister had a whole bunch when she was a teenager but gave all the books away.) I’m a guy and know that 1. This series was not meant for me and 2. I can see the appeal of these books.

You see, every form of media has that one (or 100) series that really talks to people. For teenage girls, this is one of them because, even today, many girls make money babysitting. Based on this first book the babysitting stories are similar to what happened to the reader when they babysit. One thing of note is that, though a bit outdated, kids really are like this. There are good kids and then there are holy terrors. Babysitters have babysat all of these. Thus, female readers see themselves in these four girls’ shoes.

As mentioned above, the first book is a bit outdated. Since this was written in the 80s some things (like the old fashioned corded phone) will be alien to girls from this generation on. Girls will still read them because, besides the things mentioned above, the writing has not aged. There is no slang, regional sayings or even mentions of items from that time. This is another strength this series has and why some girls still read it.

Of course, these books aren’t masterpieces and aren’t as popular as they were in the 80s and 90s, but they can still be enjoyed. Think of it like this: boys have Goosebumps and girls and The Baby-sitters club. Though I am against this whole gender appropriate crap (I like Sailor Moon. Don’t say anything) this is one of those times where boys will not like what they’re reading.

Even though I’m, not the right audience, I can still see how and why this series got so popular and still read today. Though the popularity died down, girls can still read these books, enjoy them and identify with them. Just don’t expect anything too profound, though.

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Brooklyn (Movie) Review

One of the things I’ve made blatantly obvious on this blog is that I live Brooklyn. So of course whenever something takes place in Brooklyn I have to read/watch it. I remember coming across a book called Brooklyn by Colm Tóibín in the Barnes and Noble in Park Slope (one of only two B&Ns left in Brooklyn. The other one is on Court Street.) I barely remember reading like fifty pages of this book and then returning it to the library. Then the movie came out and I was unsure if I should see it. Then I finally watched it on demand and, yeah, not what I was expecting.

Eilis Lacey is just an Irish country girl whose life in going nowhere. She gets a sponsorship to go live in America but quickly gets homesick. Her life does take a turn for the better when she meets Italian-American Tony.

The first half of the movie was interesting. I actually liked Ellis and what happened to her. At the 45 minute mark, something started to feel wrong. At the 90 minute mark, it dawned on me: this is boring. Yeah, I said it, Brooklyn is boring. Ellis does absolutely nothing to move the plot forward. The plot moves her forward. Hell, I’ll actually say Ellis is barely a character.

One of the worst things about Ellis is that SHE DOES NOT SPEAK UP! Seriously, was it too hard to tell her Irish relatives that she got married in America? Of course not, because the whole third act would not exist if she did. I hate to say it, but she’s basically an Irish version of Bella Swan. Everyone else decides what she does and thinks and she just goes along with it. Add in no characterization and here’s Ellis.

The only positive thing that can be said about this movie is the acting is at least decent. It’s nothing memorable or outstanding but the actors do try their best with what’s given to them.

Brooklyn sounded like an interesting story, but the overall experience is boring with a shoestring plot. This is one of the many reasons I’m an advocate for libraries; the worst thing is to buy a book only to hate absolutely hate it.

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Review

It’s been nine years since Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows was published and every Potter fan has grown up. Not to mention Warner Bros. has been trying to find its next cash cow for years and hasn’t found one. Well, rejoice Potter fans because another Harry Potter book has been published called Harry Potter and the Cursed Child. And it’s a play instead of a novel.

Now, that is one thing I keep hearing people complain about this. The thing is, every media outlet has said that it’s the script to the play that opened the same day the book came out. This should not come as a shock. Also, plays are super easy to read, especially if they’re modern plays. This isn’t Shakespeare or a Greek play. Also, it’s the first Harry Potter play in nine years.

Anyway, onto the plot. Nineteen years after Deathly Hallows, our heroes have kids who are going off to Hogwarts. Albus, Harry and Ginny’s second son, is having daddy issues in that everyone expects him to be at the same level as his dad. Not to mention he’s best buds with Scorpius Malfoy and was sorted into Slytherin. So he and Scorpius decided to steal a time turner and go back in time to change the future.

Obviously, there are a lot of paradoxes in this story and none of them are good. Yes, it’s one of those stories. Cliche though it may be, it’s actually quite interesting. Yes, most of the story is focused on the kids, but remember Harry’s story has been told. Hell, look at another series that did the same thing: Naruto. They are now coming out with stories about Naruto’s son Boruto and the fans like it.

Admittedly, there are some sour notes to the story. One of the major ones is Draco Malfoy being pretty damn out of character. He’s WAY too nice to Harry even if his son is in trouble. Him also trying not to be his dad is another thing that doesn’t make sense. He did everything to follow in his dad’s footsteps in the first seven books.

Then there’s the power of love. I’ll leave it at that.

Another downside is the main villain. This character has a cliche backstory and isn’t all that interesting. Yes, this character does have some new interesting powers, but on a whole was pretty weak.

Of course, novel writing and playwriting are two different things. John Tiffany and Jack Thorne are both stage veterans and the script itself is well directed even if some of the stuff can only be done with a Broadway budget. It’s one of those plays that are easy to pick up and do any kind reading, even if it is a drunken dramatic one.

“Harry Potter and the Cursed Child” may be a play, but the story is good enough for a Harry Potter story and it does make you want to see the play. It’s too bad that as of the publication of this review you can only see it in England at the Palace Theatre in London. Just hope it does well to come over to the US or, if you’re an actor, try to get your company to do your own production.

 

 

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Diary of a Haunting Review

I love horror. I may be as big of a horror fan as many people, but I do like it. the problem I found is that horror works best as a visual medium. It’s rare to find a good, scary horror story and usually, these are in the form of short stories or novellas. Stephen King gets away with writing 600-page horror stories because he apparently found the secret to it. One of the most recent examples I found is Diary of a Haunting by M. Verano. Once again, I found this while browsing the library and the cover is what caught my eye.

Paige, her mom and brother Logan has moved into an old house in Idaho from LA. Of course, she hates her new house. Main reason is because of all the flies and spiders the house has. Soon after moving, Logan starts acting weird and there are times when electronics in the house start to not work properly. Not to mention there is a buzzing noise in Logan’s room. Paige thinks that the house may be haunted, but there is plenty of people saying otherwise.

One word perfectly describes this book: dull. Absolutely nothing scary happens. It’s just spiders, flies, cell phones not working and Logan having seizures and acting weird. There is no ghost, there’s nothing scary about the house except it has a morgue once upon a time and Logan is acting weird. There is NO suspense to this book whatsoever.

The writing style is supposed to be a diary since this book is called Diary of a Haunting. It reads more like a regular first person narrative than just a bunch of journal entries. I hate using this example, but the best place to see what a good journal entry story looks like is Diary of Anne Frank. Yes, I’m aware that was a real diary, but it’s the best reference.

Let’s not forget the ending. Rushed doesn’t even begin to describe it. Hell, it’s even predictable. There are clues all over that point to how this book would end.

This book is 310 pages. None of them are scary. The only scary bits are the black and white photos this book has to make it seem like it’s “based on real life.” It just goes to show you that you can’t judge a book by its cover. That image does not happen in the book. The book would’ve been much better if that happened. Skip this book.

Expect a review of the new Harry Potter book next time.

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Good Omens Review

I know I’ve been away for far longer than I should, but I’ve not been well and had classes to attend. Now I’m back with a review of a book that I pushed to the side years ago like a dummy: Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. When I first read it years ago I didn’t get it. After re-reading and finishing it, I have a new found respect for it.

Heaven and Hell are preparing for the end of the world because The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch says the world will end on a specific date. Problem is, the angel Aziraphale and the demon Crowley rather like Earth, thank you very much, but they have work to do. One of them is getting the Anti-Christ born and finding him. They messed that up and don’t know where he is. Now everyone is trying to gather in the spot where the prophecy says just because it’s a prophecy.

This is the first time where the end of the world is made fun of and both Pratchett and Gaiman do a fine job. The humor is that dry British humor that makes you want a spot of tea afterward. Most of it, however, isn’t laugh out loud funny, but there some that are few and far between. That doesn’t mean it’s not funny, it’s just not that particular kind of funny.

The idea of an angel and devil living on Earth and liking it is funny. It’s funnier that they work together and only have a friendly jab at each other once in awhile. There should be more of this kind of situation.

Don’t worry about not knowing who wrote what part. Each writer has their own unique style and it’s easy to tell who wrote what. Each part is equally as good as the other and they have some great chemistry with each other.

Everything isn’t perfect, though. For one, most of the book is just set to the ending. We do learn about each character, but some like the witchfinders and Anathema aren’t all that well fleshed out. They aren’t even all that important to the finale.

In all, I should’ve given this book a much better chance. Some some criticisms, this is an excellent book by two great authors that’ll we’ll never see work together again. Give it a shot.

 

 

 

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The Fall of Arthur Review

J. R.R Tolkien is considered to be one of the greatest fantasy writers ever.. Of course, like many people, I found out about him when the first Lord of the Rings movie came out. I did read The Hobbit and liked it. The first Lord of the Rings book, well, didn’t like. Mind you this was twelve years ago so I may go back to it. I did decide to read the epic poem Tolkien wrote called The Fall of Arthur recently and it was awesome.

For those who don’t know, Tolkien was a professor at Oxford university and a lot o his works are based on classic literature (The Lord of the Rings has a lot biblical and British mythology in it.) He always wanted to add a story to the Arthurian myth. He started it and, sadly, never finished it. It’s a shame really because he was on to something with the story. The story is basically Arthur and his knights fighting Mordred to get Guinevere back. It’s a nice little story that perfectly fits with the Arthurian myth.

Since this is an epic poem, we need to look at it as a poem. One thing that I’ll give Tolkien credit is that he knows how to write poems and songs. Some people may not like that it is written in “old English” (it’s actually Modern English or “Shakespearian English.” Old English actually looks a lot like German.) This was actually a smart move on Tolkien’s part in that it looks a lot like what any Medieval poet would write. It also flows nicely and even sounds nice when you read it out loud.

It’s a shame that only fifty pages of it exist. I would’ve loved to see this story complete because I want to know what happens next. Add this to the list of things that need to come back along with the Epic of Gilgamesh, the Library of Alexandria and the Legacy of Kain team.

J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Fall of Arthur is an excellent modern epic poem that will sadly never be completed. Even though I’m not a huge fan of Tolkien, this poem is something I must commend him for. It shows his excellent grasp of literature and poetry skills. I say to every literature professor, have your students read this as part of the Arthurian Legend curriculum. It’s about as important as Mallory’s Mort D’Arthur and White’s Once and Future King.

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The War Within These Walls Review

I tend to avoid any novels about Jews in World War II. The biggest reason being they are way too depressing (The Diary of Anne Frank, anyone?) It’s not that they are poorly written or anything, it’s just something that I never really bothered to touch on except when I really have to. I broke with tradition and picked up one of those books called The War Within These Walls by Aline Sax with illustrations by Caryl Strzelecki.

Based on the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, Misha, and his family are forced to live in the ghetto with the rest of the Jews. After what seems like an eternity being abused by the Germans, Misha comes across a resistance group that decides to stand up against the Germans.

This book is told in the first person, but it’s presented like a poem but not really a poem. Confused? You have to read the book to know what I’m talking about. One thimg this book deos is that one page is white and the other is black. It seems like the black pages are more for writing that is supposed to be super shocking than on white pages, but it’s hard to decern with all the horrible things happening. One of the worst things that happen is Misha sees a German soldier kick over a baby carriage, pick up the baby, slam it against a way and then shoot the mother. That was the only time I stopped reading for a while.

Is the book any good? Well, it is cleverly written, has some nie illustrations and shocking, but it’s nothing groundbreaking. This may sound heartless, but these kind of stories are a dime a dozzen. Yes, World War II was hell for everyone involved and we must hear the voices of those involved, but the sheer number of these stories is staggering. While these stories are important and have historical significance and we must hear them in order to not repeat history, the genre is now tired.

It’s not a bad book, it’s just something we’ve heard many times, but it is one of the better-written books out there.

The War Within These Walls may be one of the better written World War II books about the Jews, it feels the same. Yes, I will say it is one of the more important books as well as Mause and The Diary of Anee Frank, but don’t expect anything different.

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Reading the Oz Books.

The Wizard of Oz was a huge gamble for MGM when it came out in 1939 seeing as how expensive it was to film because filming in color was unheard of back then. It may have done reasonably well in theaters, but it gained a huge following when it started airing on TV. What some people may not know is that this was based on a book by L Frank Baum. A book that’s book one of fifteen. Yes, FIFTEEN, Oz books.

Now, if you’re thinking about reading all fifteen Oz books, I’m here to tell you that, no don’t. Only read the first three (maybe four,) and then stop.

Let’s start at the beginning. The first book, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, is about young girl Dorothy who has whisked away to a magical land called OZ. Her farmhouse kills the Wicked Witch of the East. Of course, her sister, the Wicked Witch of the West, is none too happy about that. So, Dorothy is given the silver slippers by the Good Witch of the North (not Glinda as the movie says( and is sent to the Emerald City to seek help from The Wizard.

This is probably the best book of the lot and, of course, there are a lot of differences from the movie. What makes this book great is that while it is the typical book of a kid finding him/herself in a fantasy world, that’s not the point. The point is more along the lines of a kid going through hardships in order to grow up. Not to mention that this world is pretty much something a kid would imagine based on their real life.

The differences between the book and movie are apparent. For one, the slippers are silver and not ruby like in the movie. Also, we don’t see Glinda until the end of the book and she’s the Good Witch of the South. Not to mention the Cowardly Lion and Dorothy are the only ones who get captured by the Wicked Witch. Dorothy kills her by, well, getting angry and throwing a bucket of water on her to shut her up. No epic chase, just “I’ve had enough of your shit.” Also, the flying monkeys are just slaves controlled by a cap the witch wears (and Dorothy uses.)

The next two books, The Marvelous Land of Oz and Ozma of Oz, tell of how Ozma, the real ruler of Oz, comes back and Dorothy’s return to Oz. They also introduce more elements of the world (a powder that makes inanimate objects come alive) and the like. Both are well worth reading.

Then we come to Dorothy and the Wizard of Oz. This is where Baum lost steam. This book is boring. Like, really boring. Not to mention this introduces a deus ex machina that is used throughout the series: a belt that the Nome King had and now Ozma has it grants the wishes of whoever wears it. This belt is used to wish Dorothy and her friends back to the Emerald City. Yawn.

Why do the books go down in quality? If you read the intros done by Baum, you’d know he was sick and tired of writing Oz books after number three. It was obvious he was phoning them in. There were some neat ideas and creatures in Oz, but the writing wasn’t really good.

So, if you want to read the OZ books, just read the first three and that’s it. Hell, go ahead and read/go see Wicked and other Oz books not written by Baum.

 

 

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