Raising Steam Review

Yes, this is yet another Terry Pratchett post. This is the last one for a long while, I swear.

Raising Steam is the second to last Discworld novel that is part of the Moist Von Lipwig storyline. Here moist is once again tasked by Lord Vetinari to take on another job: Bring the railroad to the Discworld after some country bumpkin has figured out how to make a steam engine. The problem is a bunch of drarves called the Grags want to make sure the rail road comes nowhere near their mountain.

That’s right, it’s Moist Von Lipwig VS a bunch of terrorist dwarves.

This is not Discworld. Discworld stories are a lot more complex than this, plus the old Terry Pratchett would’ve made fun of this type of story. The Grags are boring. They are nothing more than evil dwarves that you’d find in a Dungeons and Dragons campaign. The old  Discworld “villains” had a lot more going for them. Look at Teatime: he was manipulative, calculating and he had a brilliant plan. He was complex to the point where people love the character.

Let’s also look at the main leads. Moist is not the same character that Pratchett would’ve written. Here he reads like he was written by a fan fiction writer. His plans are basic, he is not charming and he is missing his usual sarcastic wit. This goes for every character in the book. Vetinari acts like a genric villain, Adora Belle is boring and…

Actually, this entire book was boring.

The story plods on for pages without anything interesting happens. Seriously, ask anyone what happens in this book and they won’t even remember.

The new characters are also forgettable. Harry King does nothing but complain about the cost of the rail road, and Dick Simnel is nothing but a poor man’s Carrot if he decided to become a engineer instead of a watchman.

I have never been so disappointed in a Discworld. Humorless, poorly written, boring and uninteresting characters. It’s like this was not written by Sir. Terry but by a fan who only had an basic idea of how to write a novel. This goes to show that every novelist has at least one bad book in them.

 

 

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